Fear Not This Night

Fear not this night
You will not go astray
Though shadows fall
Still the stars find their way

Awaken from a quiet sleep
Hear the whispering of the wind
Awaken as the silence grows
In the solitude of the night

Darkness spreads through all the land
And your weary eyes open silently
Sunsets have forsaken all
The most far off horizons

Nightmares come when shadows grow
Eyes close and heartbeats slow

Fear not this night
You will not go astray
Though shadows fall
Still the stars find their way

And you can always be strong
Lift your voice with the first light of dawn

Dawn’s just a heartbeat away
Hope’s just a sunrise away

Distant sounds of melodies
Darting through the night to your heart
Auroras, mists, and echoes dance
In the solitude of our life

Pleading, sighing arias
Gently grieving in captive misery
Darkness sings a forlorn song
Yet our hope can still rise up

Nightmares come when shadows roam
Lift your voice, lift your hope

Fear not this night
You will not go astray
Though shadows fall
Still the stars find their way

And though the night sky’s filled with blackness
Fear not, rise up, call out and take my hand

Fear not this night
You will not go astray
Though shadows fall
(Still the stars find their way)

Fear not this night
You will not go astray
Though shadows fall
(Still the stars find their way)

And you can always be strong
Lift your voice with the first light of dawn

Dawn’s just a heartbeat away
Hope’s just a sunrise away

Coding terminology explained

Mailed around the company this morning:

What we say: Horrible hack
What we mean: Horrible hack that I didn’t write.

What we say: Temporary workaround
What we mean: Horrible hack that I wrote.

What we say: It’s broken
What we mean: There are bugs in your code.

What we say: It has a few issues
What we mean: There are bugs in my code.

What we say: Obscure
What we mean: Someone else’s code doesn’t have comments.

What we say: Self-documenting
What we mean: My code doesn’t have comments.

What we say: That’s why it’s an awesome language
What we mean: It’s my favourite language and it’s really easy to do something in it.

What we say: You’re thinking in the wrong mindset
What we mean: It’s my favourite language and it’s really hard to do something in it.

What we say: I can read this Perl script
What we mean: I wrote this Perl script.

What we say: I can’t read this Perl script
What we mean: I didn’t write this Perl script.

What we say: Bad structure
What we mean: Someone else’s code is badly organised.

What we say: Complex structure
What we mean: My code is badly organised.

What we say: Bug
What we mean: The absence of a feature I like.

What we say: Out of scope
What we mean: The absence of a feature I don’t like.

What we say: Clean solution
What we mean: It works and I understand it.

What we say: We need to rewrite it
What we mean: It works but I don’t understand it.

What we say: emacs is beter than vi
What we mean: It’s too peaceful here, let’s start a flame war.

What we say: vi is beter than emacs
What we mean: It’s too peaceful here, let’s start a flame war.

What we say: IMHO
What we mean: You are wrong.

What we say: Legacy code
What we mean: It works, but no-one knows how.

What we say: ^C^C^X^X^X^XquitqQ!qdammit[esc]qwertyuiopasdfghjkl;:xwhat
What we mean: I don’t know how to quit vi.

One Ring to rule them all

Three Rings for the Elven-kings under the sky,
Seven for the Dwarf-lords in their halls of stone,
Nine for Mortal Men doomed to die,
One for the Dark Lord on his dark throne,
In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie,
One ring to rule them all, one ring to find them,
One ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them
In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.

The One Ring

(She did, after the initial shock, say yes.)

Tips for tankadins in the Walled City

I realize that I haven’t put anything up here for a good long while, and for that, I apologize.

While I’ve been slacking with the blogging side of things, over in the World of Warcraft, we’ve had a new expansion, and with it, new raids!  (Thank goodness for that; while Siege of Orgrimmar was a decent raid, we went way too long between the raid releasing and us heading off to Draenor.)  In the spirit of the old “The Light and How To Swing It” column on WoW Insider (may it rest in peace), I’ve put together some tips for tankadins that they might find useful when taking on Highmaul.

I’ll be grouping these posts as per Raid Finder Wings, so for now, I’ll be covering Kargath, The Butcher and Brackenspore (before people write in to tell me that you can go straight from Kar’gath to Twin Ogron and skip the bits in between if you really want to).  Don’t worry, these fights will be coming soon.

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Arrival of the Dovahkiin

“Skyrim legend tells of a hero known as the Dragonborn, a warrior with the body of a mortal and soul of a dragon, whose destiny it is to destroy the evil dragon Alduin.”

Meet Emily:

Emily is my one-month-old niece, and the most adorable little child ever.

We’ve already picked up that she has a keen ear for music — it calms her down whenever she’s a bit upset, and even puts a smile on her face (she’s getting old enough to do that now).  Last week though, I was over at my sister’s place visiting, and put on the Skyrim soundtrack for her: she pricked her ears up, listened for a while, and then started conducting to Jeremy Soule’s fantastic score.

Long story short, I’ve now organised the Skyrim soundtrack for my sister — and the Last Dragonborn (the Dovahkiin) may indeed be amongst us.

(Further proof: she also loves the soundtrack from The Hobbit — especially the Smaug themes.)

Honey Badger Houdini

This has been doing the social media rounds lately, so I’m guessing most of you have seen this.  Still, here it is for those who haven’t: by far, the most amusing thing I’ve seen lately.

Stoffel’s home was the Moholoholo Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre near Hoedspruit; their own blog recounts the story of Stoffel being a rather unwanted house guest.

Restoring the history book

This little site of mine has gone though several reincarnations on the software side (to say nothing of the hardware it’s hopped between over the years).  The current incarnation, using WordPress as my CMS, dates from mid-2011.  Before then, I had some static content coded in PHP which I put up in November 2006 (the little forum that still exists somewhere around this site dates from the same time) and then largely left untouched until the 2011 WordPress makeover (that site has been preserved for posterity at old.ron2k.za.net)… but, on the side, I also had a blog that predates the “Ramblings” section over here.  I started it in May 2006 on the Blogger site, and moved it over to my own hosting in 2007.  It got largely forgotten about and abandoned in 2009/10.

However, while I was doing a server audit and cleanup in preparation for the launch of a new personal project (of which I’m keeping under wraps for the time being, but you can bet that there’ll be a blog entry about it when it launches!), I came across working backups I made of the blog content from when I did the 2011 WordPress makeover.  There was a fair bit of content there, so I’ve managed to take all of that content and import it all into here.

Hence, you may notice a whole lot of content on the site dated 2006-2009.  That’s all of those old, early posts I made, available again.  Some of the content is poorly written, and a lot of the early stuff is rather immature and actually downright embarrassing when I look back on it now.  Still, it’s an interesting window into what I was up to then, and how my circumstances have changed (and indeed, how I have (hopefully!) matured) in the years since.

Seeing mountains again

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The lack of any activity from my side over the Easter Weekend comes courtesy of me indeed being far over the misty parched mountains old — in this case, the Cederberg, courtesy of Amy’s family.

And there was one thing that was apparent.  The more some things change, the more other things stay the same.

Prior to this weekend, I had visited the area twice.  I had taken Tim and Kelle on a day roadtrip in September 2012 (and which I then promptly neglected to blog about), but my previous excursion was around New Year 1993/1994, when my family took an arduous drive from Durban across the scrubbiest parts of Namaqualand to get there, stayed there for two weeks, and then spent one week more in Cape Town (indeed, it was that holiday that laid the foundation for me living there today.)  Our choice of accommodation was in Sandrif camp, where we stayed in a chalet then (we were in a tent on the opposite side of the river this time) and, apart from a new row of chalets on the ridge overlooking the river that were apparently built a few years ago (Protea 1-4 for those who have been there), this photo could have easily been taken a couple of decades ago.

20140418_101900_Richtone(HDR)

As a further example, back in 1993/1994 and being the precocious, snotty-nosed 8-year-old annoying brat that I was back then (some would argue that not much has changed there, but I think we’d better leave that for another day), I always insisted on stopping for some mountain water at a perennial waterfall located halfway up Uitkyk Pass (which joins the valley where CapeNature’s Algeria camp is located with the main plateau region).  I’m happy to report that, 20 years later, tradition has been kept alive.

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As for the weekend itself, it was filled with swimming in aforementioned freezing river, teaching the kids at the campsite how to play cricket, freezing in tent in said campsite (on our last morning, my car registered 6°C when I moved it at ~09:00; presumably it had been even colder than that during the night), going on relaxing walks, exploring the nearby cave systems and weird rock formations, wine tasting at the nearby winery and just relaxing and forgetting about the stresses of everyday life for a precious few days.

Pure bliss.  We’ll be back next year.